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Tag Archives: Christoph Fringeli

canibal caniche /
Cannibal Caniche is a collective promoting any kind of free music ! Come and discover through this festival artists from many geographical and musical horizons.

Thursday, Apr.29 @ Raum18

// Room 1 \\
John Makay / math rock
Grand Predateur / post metal war machine
Warsawwarsaw / noise trash manifesto
A.N.T.I. / arbre nuageux terrestre industriel / harsh
Manécante / krashtest / hijos de puta
Lain / ambient-speedcore
LT / cagliostro
Ucture / ambivalence
RYBN / audiovisual noise
Anna Bolena // idroscalo digitale – video installation

// Room 2 \\
Yann Hekate / experimental hiphop – downtempo
Company Fuck / Noise Karaoke
Christoph Fringeli / exp break djset
Monsieur Connard / electronica/exp hiphop
Dasha Rush / downtempo/electronica
Letal Ataraxia / exp downtemp
Kirdec / experimental breaks – field recordings
Bombyx / ambientpostindustrialspeedcore with guitar
Hecate / Yann keller / Ratbag / freaky industrial-break
Akinetik / visuals
KLABO / visuals

Friday, Apr.30 @ Rauchhaus

// Spukkomune \\
Rinus van Alebeek vs Tzii / tapes manipulation
Anton Mobin vs Dincise / free improvisation
Kro de la Bestiole / bugged TV performance
Th-Th / nerdy noises

// Keller \\
Christoph de Babalon / atmospheric dark breakcore
isAAAc / amiga destruction
GVK /industrial break/hiphop
Gouffre d’un pôle à l’autre / dirty harsh noase
Charlie Sensation / coldwave/electronica
Syd / exp djset
Marshall Reptilos / prophetic absynth primitive music
Unas / 8bit grindcore micropunkerotic show
Line Destruction / exp-ambient-noise
Vidio Atak / visuals
mysh3l / visuals
Luca Carrubba aka Husk / visuals

Saturday, May.01 @ Raum18
// Room 1 \\
Paroxysm of Anxiety / ritual darkambient
Niedowierzanie / drone improvisation with doublebass
Planetaldol / Psychotic Dark Ambient
Dawamesk / darkambient
Lifeloop / “Reel Tape Lie Detector”

// Room 2 \\
Electric Kettle / breakcore
Nomex / ritual-noise-break
Psyko-Pal / chiptunes dancefloor
Homologation Korea Nord / industrial
Massicot / noise rock
Mental D-struction / ambient atmospheric speedcore
Sim on Korfunkle / holygabber
Le Matin / oldskool electro
El Gusano Rojo / exp-noise
Julien Millot / i burn my hairs performance
D-Phaz / visuals
Brilliant Beast / visuals

Sunday, May.02 @ Loophole (After Party)

Dasha Rush / downtempo/electronica
Cancelled / Vapours Lo-Fi
Brian / experimental/electronica/surf
h. / glinglitch
GB aka Gateaux Blaster / ritual Lo-Fi
Anita / merrygoroundandround
onefuckone / apocryphowl
BadTripInc. / gentlemen’s disagreement
t.i.A [://mnmldiskotek]

Workshops

Speech about free music by christoph fringeli and tzii

Presentation of Qeve (open source video software designed in pure data) by Luca Carrubba aka Husk estereotips collective @ Rauchhaus (17h > 19h)

D.I.Y. Analog synth creation workshop
(2 days : on Friday and Saturday, 4 hours each day)
Limbus Europae, corner Kienitzer Strasse / Weisestrasse (Neuköln) please contact j.millot AT stupiddesign DOT fr for inscriptions by Julien Millot( http://www.stupiddesign.fr/ )

Decoration and Exhibition by:

Gorellaume
Myshel // Djemija // Kuny
Ian Liddle
La Plèvre // Nostyle Fuckers

FFF – Dj set @ the Bergen Teknival 2002

Tracklist / Chapters

Nico Featuring Makai
Omen
1
Polygon Window
Quoth
2
Bodenstandig 2000
Pogos Abenteuer
3
Edge Of Motion
Pg. 300
4
X-103
Curse Of The Gods
5
Electronome
Playmobile Invisible
6
Dj Y?
Phunk Rock Steady
7
Caustic Visions
Contortion
8
Aphex Twin
Donkey Rhubarb
9
Chosen Few
Name Of The Dj
10
Dj Krust
>>> Warhead
11
Fischerspooner
Emerge
12
Traffik
Incriminating Evidence
13
Kovert
Response Activator
14
Like A Tim
“Plop”
15
Dj Scud & Christoph Fringeli
Bodysnatcher
16
Patric Catani
You’re A Hero
17
Aphex Twin
54 Cymru Beats
18
Perspects
Where Are We
19
Frederik Schikowski

http://i.mixcloud.com/CGN8

as found on http://www.drivl.com/users/profile/CheShA :

Influences and Development Breakcore as a genre developed from elements of many different styles of music beginning around the mid 1990s. Simultaneously, it began to evolve out of a boredom with stagnant forms of more traditional techno and rave music as well as an evolution within noise and sound art. A need for faster BPM’s as well as a more anti-authoritarian sound also pushed the various sub-genres to more extreme states. At this point pre-breakcore came from London, Berlin and Newcastle, Australia (home of Bloody Fist Records). Early influential artists include Alec Empire, DJ Scud, Panacea, Christoph Fringeli, Nasenbluten, and more. According to Simon Reynolds in the New York Times [1] breakcore is “Purveyed by artists like DJ/Rupture and Teamshadetek, the music combines rumbling basslines, fidgety beats and grainy ragga vocals to create a home-listening surrogate for the bashment vibe of a Jamaican sound system party. Others within the breakcore genre, like Knifehandchop, Kid 606 and Soundmurderer, hark back to rave’s own early days, their music evoking the rowdy fervor of a time when huge crowds flailed their limbs to a barrage of abstract noise and convulsive rhythm. It’s a poignant aural mirage of a time when techno music was made for the popular vanguard rather than a connoisseurial elite, as it is today.” [edit] Ambush Records At the same time London’s DJ Scud co-founded Ambush Records with fellow producer Aphasic which focused on more extreme noise-oriented hardcore Drum and bass. Some artist to have released on Ambush have been Christoph Fringeli, Slepcy, Panacea, and Noize Creator all of which are still productive and active in the scene today. [edit] Bloody Fist Records At the same time, the now defunct label, Bloody Fist Records based in Newcastle, Australia released many records of hardcore/gabber, industrial, and noise. Artists signed to Bloody Fist in its lifetime include Syndicate, Xylocaine, Epsilon, and Nasenbluten. [edit] Breakcore Becomes A Genre As the early days of “hardcore techno” or just “hardcore” began to settle in Europe, Breakcore as a genre began to take more concrete forms in other parts of the world. Inspired by the seminal labels above (among others) new labels such as Addict Records from Milwaukee, USA, Peace Off Record from Rennes, France and Planet Mu from London began to take a new shape, adding in more elements of mashup and IDM to the hardcore sounds. Each of these labels began to draw in aspects of their own social and aesthetic scenes into their music thus allowing for an even broader definition of what was possible in the music while at the same time also confirming certain elements of style to unite the music. Matt Earp describes his impressions of early breakcore as “a high-bpm mash-up of hyperkinetic, post-jungle breaks, feedback, noise, and Jamaican elements paired with a devil-may-care attitude towards sampling that pulls from the broadest musical spectrum of styles (hip-hop, rock, industrial, pop, and beyond).” [2] One of the most controversial issues in Breakcore is that of the mere existence of the genre. Because it pulls liberally from other musical genres, there isn’t a consensus on what is and what isn’t Breakcore, or even over the usefulness of the term itself. Because of the fragmentation, the Breakcore scene isn’t centered in any one geographical location, but is rather scattered into disparate groups. Perhaps the one place where Breakcore’s “voice” can be heard is virtually, through the internet and various online forums, such as those at C8. [edit] The Amen Break While Breakcore is definitely not only organized around the cutting and distortion of the Amen Break, it is a key to defining the genre. The amen break in Breakcore is primarily used at high-speeds and edited to produce jarring effects when distorted and layered in combination with almost any sound. This particular drum-break sound characterizes many breakcore songs and is still used as a key factor to define the sound. This is in line with breakcore’s tendency to create a post-modern parody of Drum and Bass clichés – many of the sounds heard in breakcore are very “classic” jungle samples. [edit] Distribution Among the many types of music now being spread online, perhaps Breakcore is the most fascinating to observe in regard to its online diffusion. Since the genre as a whole still is developing and growing rapidly, the music itself is largely downloaded via peer-to-peer networks, and discussed on internet forums. Its many producers now find the samples they create the music from online, as well as use illegally downloaded software to create the music[citation needed]. Whereas the early days of Breakcore were based in select urban cities, the genre now has no geographical center. The music itself tends to reflect this multiplicity of media diffusion itself (as already mentioned) by incorporating so many different forms of music all hacked together to form breakcore. It remains a relatively small genre, but compared to its size prior to the 1990s web boom, it continues to grow substantially. [edit] Developments In the Genre Breakcore has recently been changing and branching. Many newer breakcore artists focus on melodic progressions and complex drum programming while other ‘classic’ breakcore artists still focus on distorted hardcore breakbeats and dark-edged musical influences (such as heavy metal, and industrial). A third group of artists work has developed closer to Drum and Bass, and focuses more on hardcore drum and bass sounds. A fourth group takes yet another direction towards mash-up, happy hardcore and rave to make a lighter, more humorous sound.