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just found a download link to some old mixtape by Novokain (Troops Of Doom)

info from the old Troops of Doom website:

http://metabolik.tripod.com/releases.htm:

Simply put, if Satan was a DJ, this would be his mixtape. This tape is by far the best mixtape ever to have graced my ears. True speedkore and deathkore here. The mixing here is dead on, with tons of scratching, and great track selection. Last 15 minutes of side 2 are Bezerker tracks. Get this tape and see what the shoddy L.A. promoters are missing out on. New J-card design cause we feel like it. Do not be fooled by imposters!!!

.links:
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=LBJAZHJ9
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=9NFMXMO3
Thanks to the original uploader & the original Necromancer recodings label! great stuff from the late ’90’s, if anyone can help me find the other tapes would be amazing! 

 

old interview as found on Troops of Doom:

Novokain – the best DJ that LA’s never heard of. Representing the GSM and Troops of Doom, Novokain is as hard as they get. Both on the decks and in producing his own tracks, Novokain’s style is a hard pounding bassline littered throughout with distorted guitars, death metal vocals, and just the right amount of evil samples. Oh, and fast as fuck, too!!! Anyone who has listened to any of Novokain’s tapes be it Gorefest Stench, Hardcore Militia, Shit-Fuck, or Lion’s Den 3 can’t argue that Novokain fucks it up on the decks.

“I first started spinning three and a half years ago at my friend DJ Ellament’s house, since he was the first person I knew who had tables.” said Novokain when asked when he first started spinning. Even when first starting out, Novokain would try and get his hands on anything that sounded extreme. Novokain elaborates more on the subject… “I started off spinning Rotterdam stuff, since that’s all the record shops would stock, but I would always try to find harder stuff. More noize, more terror… more ‘Umph’!!!”

Every DJ or producer has their share of influences, and Novokain is no exception. On the DJ influence, R.A.W., DJ Efex, Baseck, Mark N, and DJ Ellament all get high marks from Novokain. For producers, “Well, there’s a shitload. For startes, all the Fisters, especially Netas, Memetic, and Syndicate.”. He goes on to name other producers like Jack Lucifer, Eiterherd, Somatic Responses, “The man” Lasse Steen, Acid Enema, Christoph De Babalon, Newskin, and others that he can’t remember right off the top of his head.

When asked about how Novokain felt on the sudden Dutch and Rotterdam trend, Novokain stated “I don’t remember it getting the fuck out! Rotterdam WAS good ya know.”

What does Novokain see for the future of the Gabber/Speedkore Militia, the Troops of Doom, and the Southern California gabber producers that keep popping up more and more by the day? “I see a little scene within us… this is OUR scene. We the makers ‘make’ the scene, and it’ll keep getting bigger and better. More labels will pop up hopefully.”


(c) 1999 Troops Of Doom … eternal respect to you guys!

Listen streaming: www.mixcloud.com/jondica/dica-furthur-me…nd-midwest-memories/

Download mp3: http://soundcloud.com/jondica/jon-dica-furthur-memories-2010

All vinyl, one take as always. Mixed September 2010 in Hong Kong at the Mystic Junk Studios, Inc.

 

Tracklisting:
00:00 Dub & Run – Young Folks [Dub & Run]
04:32 16bit – Swine Flu [Audio Freaks]
06:58 Dave Clarke – Shake Your Booty [Deconstruction]
11:22 Jeff Mills – The Extremist [Tresor]
14:42 Tesox – Go Ahead London [Plastic City]
17:51 DJ Hyperactive – Axxe Attack [Drop Bass Network]
22:20 Fanon The Big Kid – Thrust [Drop Bass Network]
26:00 Rowland The Bastard – Jupiter Stroll [Bionic Orange]
30:50 Roots – Racing Car [Adam & Eve]
33:11 Goio – Basic Needs [Drop Bass Network]
37:16 Somatic Responses – Nova 166 [Drop Bass Network]
40:42 Choose – Light Removal [Drop Bass Network]
44:55 Johnny Cash – Flushed From The Bathroom Of Your Heart [Columbia]
46:32 Influid II – Push The Button [Influence]
49:58 Delta 9 – The Hate Tank (Buckwild Mix) [Drop Bass Network]
53:03 Delta 9 – Watch Yer Back [Industrial Strength]
56:30 Nasenbluten – Cocksucker [Industrial Strength]
57:22 Nasenbluten – Cuntface [Industrial Strength]
61:37 Scarface – Among The Walking Dead [Motown]
63:04 Syndicate – Appetite For Destruction [Bloody Fist]
67:11 Doormouse – Beer Theme [Distort]
69:51 Doormouse – Cult of AOL [Distort]
73:28 Nasenbluten – Treadmill [Bastard Loud]
75:28 Memetic – More Fukd Crap Muzak [Bloody Fist]
77:21 Stunt Rock – I Cant Believe I Ate You Out. [Addict]
80:05 Hammer Bros – Untitled from Police Story [Digitalhut Sounds]
80:50 Amiga Shock Force – Kik Me [Blut]
83:37 Frank Zappa & The Mothers Of Invention – Help I’m A Rock (Suite In Three Movements) [Verve]

as found on http://www.drivl.com/users/profile/CheShA :

Influences and Development Breakcore as a genre developed from elements of many different styles of music beginning around the mid 1990s. Simultaneously, it began to evolve out of a boredom with stagnant forms of more traditional techno and rave music as well as an evolution within noise and sound art. A need for faster BPM’s as well as a more anti-authoritarian sound also pushed the various sub-genres to more extreme states. At this point pre-breakcore came from London, Berlin and Newcastle, Australia (home of Bloody Fist Records). Early influential artists include Alec Empire, DJ Scud, Panacea, Christoph Fringeli, Nasenbluten, and more. According to Simon Reynolds in the New York Times [1] breakcore is “Purveyed by artists like DJ/Rupture and Teamshadetek, the music combines rumbling basslines, fidgety beats and grainy ragga vocals to create a home-listening surrogate for the bashment vibe of a Jamaican sound system party. Others within the breakcore genre, like Knifehandchop, Kid 606 and Soundmurderer, hark back to rave’s own early days, their music evoking the rowdy fervor of a time when huge crowds flailed their limbs to a barrage of abstract noise and convulsive rhythm. It’s a poignant aural mirage of a time when techno music was made for the popular vanguard rather than a connoisseurial elite, as it is today.” [edit] Ambush Records At the same time London’s DJ Scud co-founded Ambush Records with fellow producer Aphasic which focused on more extreme noise-oriented hardcore Drum and bass. Some artist to have released on Ambush have been Christoph Fringeli, Slepcy, Panacea, and Noize Creator all of which are still productive and active in the scene today. [edit] Bloody Fist Records At the same time, the now defunct label, Bloody Fist Records based in Newcastle, Australia released many records of hardcore/gabber, industrial, and noise. Artists signed to Bloody Fist in its lifetime include Syndicate, Xylocaine, Epsilon, and Nasenbluten. [edit] Breakcore Becomes A Genre As the early days of “hardcore techno” or just “hardcore” began to settle in Europe, Breakcore as a genre began to take more concrete forms in other parts of the world. Inspired by the seminal labels above (among others) new labels such as Addict Records from Milwaukee, USA, Peace Off Record from Rennes, France and Planet Mu from London began to take a new shape, adding in more elements of mashup and IDM to the hardcore sounds. Each of these labels began to draw in aspects of their own social and aesthetic scenes into their music thus allowing for an even broader definition of what was possible in the music while at the same time also confirming certain elements of style to unite the music. Matt Earp describes his impressions of early breakcore as “a high-bpm mash-up of hyperkinetic, post-jungle breaks, feedback, noise, and Jamaican elements paired with a devil-may-care attitude towards sampling that pulls from the broadest musical spectrum of styles (hip-hop, rock, industrial, pop, and beyond).” [2] One of the most controversial issues in Breakcore is that of the mere existence of the genre. Because it pulls liberally from other musical genres, there isn’t a consensus on what is and what isn’t Breakcore, or even over the usefulness of the term itself. Because of the fragmentation, the Breakcore scene isn’t centered in any one geographical location, but is rather scattered into disparate groups. Perhaps the one place where Breakcore’s “voice” can be heard is virtually, through the internet and various online forums, such as those at C8. [edit] The Amen Break While Breakcore is definitely not only organized around the cutting and distortion of the Amen Break, it is a key to defining the genre. The amen break in Breakcore is primarily used at high-speeds and edited to produce jarring effects when distorted and layered in combination with almost any sound. This particular drum-break sound characterizes many breakcore songs and is still used as a key factor to define the sound. This is in line with breakcore’s tendency to create a post-modern parody of Drum and Bass clich├ęs – many of the sounds heard in breakcore are very “classic” jungle samples. [edit] Distribution Among the many types of music now being spread online, perhaps Breakcore is the most fascinating to observe in regard to its online diffusion. Since the genre as a whole still is developing and growing rapidly, the music itself is largely downloaded via peer-to-peer networks, and discussed on internet forums. Its many producers now find the samples they create the music from online, as well as use illegally downloaded software to create the music[citation needed]. Whereas the early days of Breakcore were based in select urban cities, the genre now has no geographical center. The music itself tends to reflect this multiplicity of media diffusion itself (as already mentioned) by incorporating so many different forms of music all hacked together to form breakcore. It remains a relatively small genre, but compared to its size prior to the 1990s web boom, it continues to grow substantially. [edit] Developments In the Genre Breakcore has recently been changing and branching. Many newer breakcore artists focus on melodic progressions and complex drum programming while other ‘classic’ breakcore artists still focus on distorted hardcore breakbeats and dark-edged musical influences (such as heavy metal, and industrial). A third group of artists work has developed closer to Drum and Bass, and focuses more on hardcore drum and bass sounds. A fourth group takes yet another direction towards mash-up, happy hardcore and rave to make a lighter, more humorous sound.